Heading Logo


Stone, plaque commemorates site of David Hudson cabin

By LIZ MURPHY Destination Hudson Published: June 18, 2017 12:00 AM
  • 1 of 1 Photos | View More Photos

On June 26, 1799, David Hudson set foot in what was to be Hudson Township. He built a log cabin at the corner of North Main and Baldwin Streets, although he didn't return permanently until 1800. On that corner there is a large stone with a plaque commemorating this piece of history.

A 1926 article in the local paper indicates that in the late 20s the school teachers were promoting both history and veteran recognition projects. One offshoot of this was the project to establish a stone and plaque commemorating the site of David Hudson's first cabin. "Stockholder" certificates were sold, and this historical marker was funded by the students.

Family diaries suggest that glass windows were added in 1800 when the patriarch brought his family here to settle. Hudson and his family travelled from Goshen Connecticut with six children, and a seventh, Anner Maria Hudson, was born a few months after their arrival. She was the first white child born in what is now Summit County.

In 1805 the need for space necessitated a second cabin built to the east of the original The first night the family slept in the new structure, a chimney fire caused the original cabin to burn to the ground. Most of the family's possessions were lost, but they managed to save a massive desk that was informally known as "the Post Office", which contained many of Hudson's official papers. David Hudson served as the township's first postmaster, holding the office until 1829 (when he was removed from the position after opposing Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election).

Some of these papers saved from the fire can be found in the archives of the Hudson Historical Society. In addition, right outside the archives on the second floor of the Library, there is an antique desk very similar to the desk known as "the Post Office."

The Reinberger Foundation and Hudson Community Foundation have funded our site on the Next Exit History app, which provides information about this piece of Hudson history and many more.


Rate this article

Do you want to leave a comment?   Please Log In or Register to comment.